quotations from each episode

 

 

Escape From Tomorrow

 

 

A Prefect rides with his son, Arno, and gorilla soldiers to the location of the spaceship crash.

Prefect:
Youíre not to say a word about this.

Arno:
Why not, father? Itís so exciting, itís soÖ

Prefect:
Itís dangerous. Humans know their place, and that mustnít change! If they ever learn that other humans were able to build and fly a machine like this, theyíll begin to think theyíre as good as we are.

Arno:
But father, look, these humans must be better than we are.

 

 

Farrow:
I found this cave two years ago. I never told anyone. Youíll be safe here.
Burke:
Safe? From what?
Farrow:
The apes, of course. Iíll be back as soon as I can.
Virdon:
ApesÖ?
Burke:
(flatly) Thatís what the man said.

 

 

Urko:
(speaking of the astronauts) This is an infection, Zaius! One doesnít question it! One wipes it out!

 

 

Virdon:
Iíve been thinking. The input record of our flight is still on the spaceship. Everything that happened from the time we left home until we landed back here on Earth was recorded on that magnetic disk. All we have to do is run it through a computer, analyze what went wrong, reverse the process, and maybe we can get back home again.

Burke:
Youíre out of your mind.

Galen:
Whatís a computer?

Virdon:
Maybe, just maybe, the humans who built that grenade are still on Earth, and they have the knowledge toÖ

Burke:
To do what? Build a spaceship? And a computer?

Virdon:
Maybe.

Galen:
Whatís a computer?

 

 

Zaius:
Do you realize that possession of such a book, alone, is punishable by death?
Galen:
Why, Zaius? Why should truth be against the law?

 

 

Galen:
Was there ever a time when humans controlled the world, and the apes were kept behind bars?

Zaius:
I said you had much to learn, but that didnít include heresy.

Galen:
Maybe they were right, Zaius. Maybe the world would be better if no creature controlled another, if all worked together as equals.

 

 

Virdon:
Look, Iím warning youÖ

Zaius:
Yes, I know! Youíll destroy me as your kind once destroyed the world!

Burke:
What do you mean?

Zaius:
Your science and your machines Ė very few know your history, and very few will ever know. And your cities! Death and destruction! We donít want them! We donít even want their memory.

Burke:
Oh my GodÖ

Zaius:
Yes, you did it to yourselves, as you would do it again. That human was caught trying to sneak into the city. And yes, I had him killed. As I will have you killed some day. As I must have poor Galen killed.

Virdon:
GalenÖ

Zaius:
The infection you carry is fatal.

 

The Gladiators

 

 

Burke:
There were some who wouldnít kill for any reason. Pacifists. They figured human life was just too special.

Dalton:
Do you understand this?

Galen:
Iíve never understood the need to kill. Itís a thing for humans.

 

 

Burke:
This is Galen. My friend.

Dalton:
Friend? An ape?

Galen:
Yes. Itís possible.

 

 

Dalton:
(talking to his father about his mother) She said there was no honor in killing.

Tolar:
She said. But she loved me. She never would have noticed me if not for the games. I would have been nothing except for the games.

Dalton:
How many men have you killed, father?

Tolar:
The Prefect created the games and they brought peace to the village.

Dalton:
How many men have you killed?

Tolar:
As many as I have fought.

 

 

Dalton:
My father?

Barlow:
He was a brave man.

Dalton:
And the games?

Barlow:
I'm afraid the games died with him. Perhaps there is a better way to govern.

Dalton:
There must be.

Barlow:
Tell your friends I have never met them, and they have never met me. And wish them goodluck for me.

 

The Trap

 

 

Zako:
Urko, how did you know the humans olar:OWARDwere lying?

Urko:
I always assume that humans are lying. Makes things easier.

Zako:
Iíll remember that.

 

 

Urko and Burke are trapped underground, trying to fashion a make-shift ladder.

Urko:
What youíre doing is human laboróIím not someone who does human labor.

Burke:
Are you someone who enjoys suffocating?

Urko:
Iíll make an exception in this case.

 

 

Burke:
(pointing out a poster to Urko on the subway wall, pretending that apes and humans worked together to invent many things in the past) E.M.óElectro-neurological monitoring. You got something wrong with your head, you hook yourself up, calm yourself down. Thatís something you could use, Urko.

 

 

Virdon:
(to the gorillas helping to rescue Urko and Burke) We can use this girder here as a fulcrum.

Zako:
Fulcrum?

Virdon:
Itís a way to get the most out of the energy we use. All right, you two (gesturing to the gorilla soldiers) get your horses and ropes over here.

Zako:
No! Youíll stay where you are. I give the orders here.

Virdon:
All right, then give them!

Zako:
You! (pointing) get the ropes and you, get the horses.

 

 

Burke:
I don't suppose that my word would satisfy you, would it? That I wouldn't say anything?

Urko:
The word of a human? How many times have you lied to me today?

 

The Good Seeds

 

 

Urko:
(speaking to a gorilla soldier) These humans are dangerous. They stir up trouble. They think theyíre as good as we are.

 

 

Anto:
Wait. Itís bad enough having humans in the house, but wash first. Thereís a smell about you.

Burke:
Nobodyís perfect.

 

Virdon:
The lovable Anto is chomping at the bit to get us out of here.

Galen:

Apes do not chomp at bits.

Virdon:
Oh, Iím sorry. Heís anxious.

 

The Legacy

 

 

Zaius:

(Referring to a repository of human knowledge): Knowledge, death, destruction. In the history of this world, one has been the same as the other. Destroy everything in here. Burn this place to the ground.

Urko:
Wait. What is here would give us great power! The knowledge would be safe with usóweíre not like humans.

Zaius:
Would we really be better off, or safer? Remember, once the knowledge in here is set free, it will spread out of control.

Urko:
I will be in control!

 

Tomorrow's Tide

 

 

Galen:
(to Gahto, a human laborer who was set afloat at sea to be given to the sea gods)
Ömost humans do not share your enthusiasm for dying. I promise you, Gahto, I promise you, sooner or later, you will be able to die. In the meantime, stay in the cave!
(pushes him)

The Surgeon

 

 

Galen:
Hello, Kira.

Kira:
As simple as that. This (holds the flower Galen brought) to remind me, a casual helloÖand everything else is forgotten.

Galen:
Not everything.

Kira:
Go away, Galen.

Galen:
Kira, a friend of mine has been hurt.

Kira:
You donít have any friends but renegade humans.

Galen:
Unless you help him he may die.

Kira:
Why should I care if a human dies?

Galen:
If for no other reason than because I careÖ a very great deal.

Kira:
I donít know you anymore. Youíre a stranger whoís chosen to live with humans!

Galen:
Is that such a dreadful crime?

 

 

Kira:
I was thinking about the orderly we sent to disciplinary camp for disobeying orders. Do you think we dealt with him a little bit too harshly?

Leander:
He behaved like an unruly beast. Like an unruly beast, he deserved to be punished. Whereís the harshness?

Kira:
Are humans nothing but beasts?

Leander:
At their best, theyíre useful animals. At their worst, theyíre carriers of hatred and destruction.

 

 

Burke sits down in the human compound for dinner

Burke:
This is terrific. What is it, dried mule's hooves? Say, wouldn't have some sauce for a taste killer, would you?

Travin:
We have what we have.

Burke:
(speaking to a silent girl who serves the table) Oh, thank you.

Travin:
Don't talk to her.

Burke:
I was just gonna ask her name.

Travin:
Her name was taken from her. She is no one.

Burke:
What'd she do, criticize the chef?

 

 

Galen:
I will get you that book. With that in your hands, you can advance our medicine. That book is life.

Kira:
If weíre caught, it means death.

Galen:
If we get caught, Iíll confess that I forced you to do this by threatening your life.

Kira:
Do you think I want you to die?

Galen:
No one wants to die, human or ape. We canít turn back now. We canít.

 

 

Kira:
You think I have some feeling for Galen or for your friend or you?

Virdon:
Maybe.

Kira:
Galen means no more to me than you do. Do you understand that?

Virdon:
I understandÖ the words.

Kira:
Humans are nothing. You have no character, no sense of honor, no loyalty, nothing. If they did, you never would have allowed yourself to be brought here. I mean, Galen is risking his life and you canít even see the danger heís in because of youÖ because you are blind and sentimental. And you canít control your thoughts and your emotions. And you will destroy Galen and your friend. And you will all be destroyed.

 

 

Kira:
Diagrams of the circulatory system, surgical proceduresÖ is this a medical text or a book of fiction?

Galen:
You knew the answer the moment you saw it.

Kira:
I canít believe a human wrote this If Zaius knows about it, why didnít he let us know?

Galen:
Political reasons. If humans knew they could write books like this, would they be content to be slaves? Zaius was afraid that it would be the end of our civilization.

Kira:
What if he was right?

 

 

Kira:
Iím a doctor. I have no right to reject the truth.

Leander:
The truth? That book is not truth! That book is treason, that book is madness.

Kira:
That book exists and to deny what exists is madness.

 

The Deception

 

 

Galen speaks with a blind chimp, Fauna, who believes

Burke is an ape

Galen:
Fauna, you must be careful. You canít trust a love that comes so quickly.

Fauna:
Is time any guarantee that a love will be binding? Phoebus, I know itís asking a lot for him to love someone thatís blind, but do you think itís possible?

Galen:
Do you want an honest answer?

Fauna:
Of course.

Galen:
No. I do not think that it is possible.

Fauna:
I can do anything that a female with sight can do!

Galen:
Except to recognize the truth! He is not an apeóthat you can, uh, trust.

Fauna:
I donít believe you. I think youíre the one not to be trustedóyouíre supposed to be his friend.

Galen:
He is my friend, but I know him!

 

 

Virdon and Perdix, the gorilla head of law enforcement in the village, are both on horses. Virdon has a rifle on Perdix, bringing him to the meeting site of the dragoons who have been killing local humans and burning their houses. They stop at the top of a hill, looking down to where the dragoons are supposed to meet.

Virdon:
You said you wanted the dragoons. See if youíre more interested than you are in killing me. (He tosses the weapon to Perdix, leaving himself completely unprotected)

 

 

Burke:
Hi, Fauna. Yeah itís me, Pargo.

Fauna:
You shouldnít be here.

Burke:
Well, I had to talk to you.

Fauna:
Did Phoebus tell you what I said to him?

Burke:
Look, Faunaó

Fauna:
Itís all right, itís all right if you donít care for me. I understand. Itís too soon. Perhaps in time, you will and thenó

Burke:
Look, um, I think youíre very lovely and gentle There are things about me you donít even know.

Fauna:
Now you sound like Phoebus.

Burke:
Yeah, well maybe you should have listened to him!

Fauna:
You tell meóyou tell me what is so wrong about you that it surpasses what is wrong with me?

Burke:
Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. (sighs) You know, this reminds me of a story my mother used to tell me when I was very young.

Fauna:
Tell me.

Burke:
Well, this is a story about an old blind man named Isaac and his two sons, Jacob and Esau. Esau was a hunter, and he was strong and hairy, and his father idolized him. Old Isaac was very sick and on his deathbed, he gave Esau his blessing, which was a big thing in those days. Now the other son, Jacob, had very soft, smooth skin and he wanted his fatherís blessing as well. So he pretended to be his brother Esau by covering his hand with a piece of goatskin. And Isaac was fooled into thinking he was touching Esau and he gave Jacob the same blessing.

Fauna:
Iím not sure that I understand the meaning of your story.

Burke:
It was a deception, Fauna, born out of desperate need, but not meant to harm anyone.

Fauna:
But you couldnít deceive anyone, Pargo. I have touched your face. It is strong, like Esauís. If it was soft and smooth, like Jacob, I should fear and despise you.

Burke:
Fauna, you must understand there is nothing between us, and that there can never be. My friends are going to leave here today and youíll never sóyou will never hear my voice again.

Fauna:
(softly) Oh, no.

Burke hands Fauna her fatherís journal.

Burke:
Goodbye, Fauna.

 

 

Virdon and Burke rescue Fauna from drowning and carry her back to shore together.

Burke:
Fauna, Fauna, itís all right now, itís all right.

Fauna:
Pargo, is that you?

Burke:
Yes. (Fauna touches his face)

Fauna:
No, youíre not Pargo, youíre human!

Burke:
It was a deception, born of desperate need, Fauna, not meant to harm.

Fauna:
Get away, get away from me!

Sestus:
Fauna, Fauna, this is your Uncle Sestus, nothing to be afraid of.

Fauna:
But heís human, heís human!

Sestus:
Itís all right. Heís not going to hurt you.

Fauna:
Get him away, get him awayÖ he tricked me, he tricked me, like the others tricked my father. Theyíre treacherous! Theyíre like animals and they must be treated like animals.

Sestus:
Fauna, now listen to me. This human saved your life. He risked his own life to save you.

Fauna:
I hate him, I hate him. A human killed my father, he killed him.

Virdon:
Fauna, itís Alar, listen to me please. I donít know if a human did kill your father, but if it happened, that doesnít mean all humans are bad. Just like all apes arenít good.

 

The Horse Race

 

 

Urko:
Relax. After all, itís only a horse race.

Prefect:
With half my horses and half my land bet on the result.

Urko:
Well, think how rich youíll be if you win.

Prefect:
If, if, IF! You insist on the race, you make all the arrangements, you demand the bet. Have you ever lost a race to any prefect?

Urko:
Thereís always a first time. (He laughs. The horses approach the finish line with Urkoís rider clearly in the lead.)

Urko:
Ö
well, better luck next year.

Urkoís horse throws a shoe. The Prefectís horse passes him and wins the race.

Prefect:
(exultant) There is a first time!

Urko:
Shut up.

 

 

Gregor:
I never talked to an ape before.

Galen:
Really?

Gregor:
I mean, they talked at me, you know, given me orders, things like that, but never just like you and I are talking, saying things you feel like saying.

Galen:
Would you believe it was many years before I spoke to a human, except for giving orders?

Gregor:
Why should apes give orders? Why do we have to obey?

Galen:
Well, there are two answers to thatómine and the authorities. Seeing mine isnít backed up by bullets, I think you should listen to the authorities.

 

 

Galen:
An ape of my wealth and position with two human servants, walk? I can borrow a horse, canít I, Martin?

Martin:
Right away.

Galen:
You two walk. And please be sure to maintain a respectful distance behind me. (utters self-satisfied noises and walks out)

Disgusted, Burke mimics Galen's ape chatter

 

The Interrogation

 

 

 

 

 

Zaius and Wanda, a chimpanzee scientist, tell Urko their plans for Burke

Urko:
Brainwashing?

Wanda:
The psychological method of washing out of the human brain old ideas and replacing them with new ones. And thatís what weíre going to do with Burke!

Urko:
Ah, yes, I seem to remember hearing something vaguely about that. Brainwashing. Is that when you take the brain out of the skull and wash it with cool water?

Wanda:
No no, you donít take the brain out of the skull!

Urko:
You donít take the brain outówell how can you wash it when you donít take it out of the skull!!

 

 

Wanda:
You have a contempt for apes, Burke. Youíll change your mind before youíre finished.

Burke:
I have no contempt for apes, nor for any other thinking animal on this planet.

 

 

Burke:
I can see your mouth moving but I canít hear anything youíre saying. All those bells and drums are too loud, theyíre deafening me.

Wanda:
If theyíre too loud now after four hours, think how theyíll sound after eight hours.

Burke:
What, can you talk louder?

Wanda:
After twenty-four hours. (to the gorilla soldier standing behind her) Lieutenant. Shoot.

Burke:
Hold it. You gotta be kidding.

Wanda:
Iím quite capable of it, Burke. Obviously you can hear when it suits you.

 

 

Yalu:
(Galen's father) He is a human. I am an ape. He is my enemy.

 

 

Yalu:
Your friends are humans. Strange friends for a chimpanzee.

Galen:
Not if you know them. Youíd respect them, too, if not for your stupid prejudices.

Yalu:
I am older than you. Perhaps those so-called stupid prejudices are based on reason.

Galen:
No they are not. They are based on custom and on habit. And you know it!

Yalu:
Even if I agreed with youóand I donítódo you think you can change the whole world?

Galen:
Iíd like to.

 

 

A physician speaks to Urko of the lobotomy he is to perform on Burke

Doctor:
You understand I promise nothing.This operation is still in the experimental stages. I canít guarantee success.

Urko:
What do you mean by success?

Doctor:
The patient survives and is docile.

Urko:
Itís not necessary.

Doctor:
The patient can die or worse, be left with no brain at all.

Urko:
Thatís too bad.

 

The Tyrant

 

 

Mikal:
I wonít bow and scrape to gorillas. I donít want
just enough food to stay alive. I wonít be nothing.

 

 

Galen tries to warn Urko of Aboro Ďs plot to assassinate him

Galen:
That letter was taken from the assassin he hired.

Urko:
Iím grateful to you. Let me show you my gratitude.(flings over a table, throwing Galen to the floor)

 

 

Galen:
(attempting to persuade Urko he is telling the truth about Aboro) I donít ask you to believe me. Canít you believe your own ears and your own eyes?

Urko:
I do. I see you, I hear you and I know you are enemies of the State and you will be executed.

Galen:
Execute, shoot, kill!óI am so tired of the kind of solutions you find for all problems.

 

 

Servant:
A human to see you, sir. He says it is very important.

Aboro:
A human, important?What could be important about a human?

 

 

Urko:
(to Aboro at his arrest) Bribery, corruption, conduct unbecoming to an ape. Youíre finished, Aboro, finished.

 

The Cure

 

 

Talbert:
Why donít you stayómake your home here?

Burke:
That's a good question. I guess the reason is that Virdonís got an itch in his feet and I got rocks in my head, which is why I go along. You see, weíre taking a survey of the far side of every hill on the horizon.

Galen:
Iíd like to give you a better answer. But I canít think of one.

 

Virdon:
Whatís the matter Galen, you hear something?

Burke:
Expecting company?

Galen:
Trouble.

Burke:
What is this, crystal ball time, let us in on it!

Virdon:
Whatís the matter, Galen, somethingís bothering you.

Galen:
You are. I didnít like what you did. When I joined up with you two, I knew that I would have to face the same dangers that you face. In fact, Urko has probably told his gorillas that I am first priority on his death list. With my own people, Iím a renegade. I accept that. But I did think at least that we would try to protect each other.

Burke:
Hey, whoís not protecting what, or did I miss something?

Virdon:
I still donít know what it is. If you tell me what it is, Iíll try to correct it if I can.

Galen:
You canít put water back into a broken bottle. Time and time again, you have cautioned us we must be very careful not to tell anyone about ourselves.

Virdon:
Amy.

Galen:
You told her who we are. Not only did you trust her with your life, but you trusted her with ours.

Virdon:
Youíre right, Galen. I shouldnít have told her. She was hurt and I wanted to try and make her understand why I couldnít stay. Thatís not an excuse. Iíd just like you to know why. Iím truly sorry.

Galen:
I didnít think you meant any harm.It just seemed like such a needless risk to take.

Virdon:
It was. Chalk it up to the fact that Iím only a human.

Galen:
(contemplating) Oh, yes. Sometimes I forget that humans canít help the weaknesses they have.

 

 

Galen:
(speaking of going back when they learn there is a quarantined sickness at the human village)
Just because that girl is in love with you, should I risk my life by going back there?!

Virdon:
No. Thereís no reason at all.

Galen:
And should you risk your life? I am getting to be no better than a human!

 

 

Burke:
(to Zoran, ape doctor) Youíre whistling
Dixie, Doc.

Zoran:
Whistling. IóshallĖĖspeakómoreóclearly. You still hear whistling?Is there something wrong with your ears?

 

 

Galen:
Maybe we could get away before Urko has guards posted everywhere.

Virdon:
Look Galen, you were right when you said coming back here would get us into trouble, and youíre probably right that we should leave right nowó

Galen:
But you wonít. And you, Pete?

Burke:
I know it sounds silly, Galen, it does sound silly. Sounds so silly I wonít even say it. You know the answer.

Galen:
I know the answer.I knew the answer before I asked. I always knew the answer. I always disagree and I (sighs) always go along. Maybe Iím sick in the head.

 

 

Zoran:
Urko, this disease is fatal to our people. We should use this situation to develop a cure.

Zaius:
Yes. Perhaps thereís a positive side to this. We can experiment with the humans. Even if we lost an entire human village, if an ape cure was developed, it would be worth it.

Urko:
Now weíll see, Doctor, now weíll see if the Council still believes in you. This village will burn and everyone in it. Everyone!

 

 

Zaius:
Urko, I sometimes wonder which you fear most, death or a few words of reason!

Urko:
You. I fear you, all of you. Listening to a fool. (speaking to the Council about Dr. Zoran)

 

 

Urko rides to the village with his soldiers carrying torches.

Urko:
Stand aside or die with the others in the village.

Zoran:
The Council voted!

Urko:
The Council be damned!

Zaius:
That is treason, Urko. I command you to withdraw.

Urko:
You command! You have words. I have weapons.

Zaius:
Would you kill me, Urko?

Urko:
Before I allow you to let him (Dr. Zoran) kill my troopsÖ yes!

 

 

The sick villagers come out of their homes and move together as a crowd in mute testimony of the treatmentís success.

Kava:
Urko, you are wrong.

Urko:
Silence! I order you!

Kava:
Last night somebody came to me from the village. I was dying. They gave me something to drink, bitter medicineó

Urko:

A lie. A trick!

Kava:
No! The medicine made me better. It saved my life, Urko!

Zaius:
Urko, I tell you again, take your troops and withdraw while you still have them to command.

Urko:
Withdraw! Withdraw!

 

 

Burke:

Weíre the lower species.

Zoran:
Yes.

Burke:
If weíre lower, how come weíre smarter?

Zoran:
I canít explain that.

Galen:
How would you explain that your victory is really theirs? Or did you intend to keep all the credit for
yourself?

Zoran:
I had no other choice. I have my position to uphold.

Burke:
You turn us in, you think we wonít tell Zaius?

Zoran:
(laughs) Heíd never believe you.

Galen:
(laughs back) Heíd believe me.

Zoran:
Very well, Galen. You may leave.

Galen:
Oh well, you see, where they go, I go. If they stay here, I stay.

Zoran:
You canít be serious.

Galen:
Just try me.

Zoran:
But donít you see they areÖ

Galen:
I know. Lower species.

Virdon:
Well now Zoran, youíve got a decision to make. Your loyalty or your ego.

Zoran:
Ego...Iím not familiar with that word.

Burke:
Just how are you going to feel, Doctor, when Zaius finds out that you were counseled by humansóevery move you made, every word you spoke?

 

The Liberator

 

 

Galen:
There used to be this running brook. It was
right by the house I lived in in Central City.

Burke:

You better can it, little chimp. You're gonna be crying in a minute.

Galen:
I know, but I canít help it sometimes.

Virdon:
Iím with you, Galen. Pete, if youíve developed a vaccine against the memories, give me a shot of it.

Burke:
Well, of course Iíve got a patented cure. See, if you lose one home, you try to find another one. Preferably where the natives are friendly.

 

 

Galen:
Thereís something very special about Brun. and it isnít just that mask he wears, either. HeísÖ if chimpanzees were ever afraid, and if humans were what they were afraid of, I can tell you that is a human to fear.

 

 

Virdon and Burke are captured by the humans of the village to be given as slaves to the apes

Miro:

Itíll do you no good to resist.

Virdon:
Listen to me, Miro. Youíre only hope is to fight against the gorillas, not with them. Let us out and weíll fight alongside you.

Burke:
Cut us loose and weíll take the first crack at it, you can join in.

Miro:
You are not being given to the gods for several days.

Virdon:
Where are you taking us?

Miro:
To cut logs. You must be made strong. The gorillas will not accept the weak.

Burke:
Thatís like asking a turkey to sharpen the ax before Thanksgiving.

 

 

Virdon:
(chopping wood) Miroís going out to hunt humans, isnít he?

Talia:
Yes. The meadow people.

Burke:
Too bad they donít have antlers. He could have one stuffed for the wall in his den.

Virdon:
Talia, do you realize that makes you no better than the apes? Both of you hunt humans and then make them into slaves.

Talia:
Thatís not true. We donít take slaves for ourselves.

Burke:
Theyíre still slaves, canít you see thatís wrong?

 

 

Galen:
No matter what I did, apes cannot be imprisoned by humans. Itís unnatural!

 

 

Virdon:
What would you do if one of the meadow people grabbed Talia and tried to run off with her?

Miro:
I would stop him. I would kill him. But a human does not fight apes.

Burke:
The apes are not gonna treat her a whole lot better than they are now if youíll stand up to them. Why wonít you stand up to the apes?

Talia:
Theyíre wrong, Miro. They donít understand.

Miro:
Sheís right, you donít understand.

Virdon:
All right now, listen to me. Men have had to fight for whatís important to them since Ė well, since longer than you can imagine. The only way theyíve been able to make a decent life for themselves is by burying their differences, by banding together.

Miro:
A human cannot fight apes! The gods made apes the rulers of men! Talia, come.

Virdon:
Miro, you didnít listen to a word that I said!

Miro:
You are trying to put lies in my mind. Youíre telling me to question everything that has ever been what was meant to be by gods and apes!

Burke:
You canít reach these people, they just roll over and play dead.

 

 

Miro:
I want Talia! You teach your secrets to someone else.

Brun:
In time, you will change.

Miro:
(bitterly) Is that a new law?

Brun:
A very old one. A son will honor his father.

Miro:
I did honor my father.

Brun:
I never stopped loving my son.

Miro:
Then grant my request!

 

 

Miro:
The gorillas come tomorrow. If I set you free, will you take Talia with you?

Burke:
Sure.

Virdon:
Wait. And Galen.

Miro:
The ape!?

Burke:
Or itís no deal.

 

 

Burke:
Their god wears a gas mask.

Virdon:
Their god is a gas mask.

 

 

Brun:
My mask came from the gods.

Burke:
No, it was made by men when they destroyed other men with gas like this.

Brun:
Youíre lying!

Galen:
No he is not lying. He knows about such things.

Virdon:
What are you planning to do with these? (containers filled with deadly gas)

Brun:
When I get enough, I will go to the ape village. My mask will protect me, but they will be killed.

Burke:
You canít use this gas. You canít control it. You can start by killing apes but you can wipe out the whole planet.

Brun:
All our lives, we have obeyed, begged, and crawled, and gave up those we loved because the apes were strong. Now the gods have made me strong. I will free my people.

Virdon:
Not this way. You canít win freedom by destroying the world.

Brun:
I will teach them to make masks like yours. We will fight the apes again! The gas will kill them but the masks will save our lives.

Burke:
Man, this poison gas of yours is just the beginning. Sooner or later, the apes will find their own gas and theyíll make their own masks.

Virdon:
Listen, please listen. Weíve been all through poison gas, germ warfare and atomic bombs. When you use them nobody wins!

Brun:
Do you side with the apes?

Burke:
Thatís not the point. Fight to stop slavery, all slavery, but not this way.

Brun:
We will kill only apes and we wonít stop in this valley. As long as it wonít kill my people, nothing else matters.

Galen hits Brun over the head and he collapses

Virdon:
Galen!

Burke:
You certainly picked a classic way to settle an argument. Do you think heís gonna be fonder of apes when he comes to?

 

Up Above the World So High

 

 

Galen:
You are kind.

Carsia:
Iím not quite sure thatís the right word for me.

 

 

Carsia:
Thereís nothing worse than strength and authority without intelligence. (referring to a gorilla soldier who beat Leuric) Get out of here. (to Leuric) Iím so sorry.

Leuric:

Apes are not sorry for humans.

 

 

Galen:
I know she wants to protect him (Leuric). YesÖ sheís that kind of ape.

Burke:
Hey, hey, you getting a little hung up there on her, huh?

Galen:
If you mean what I think you mean, I think you are jumping to premature conclusions. Which may be correct.

 

 

Galen:
If you tied me to that thing (the glider), kicking and screaming, I would find some way to keep my feet on the ground.

Virdon:
Itís got to be tested before we take it apart and try to get it to Leuric.

Galen:
Yes, and I intend to watch one of you test it, and I shall applaud enthusiastically if you are successful.

Burke:
What would happen if an ape looked up and saw a human flying?

Galen:
Well, he would shoot the human down.

Virdon:
Right. Youíre hanging up there on a glider, thereís not a lot of places to hide, right?

Burke:
Right. If an ape looked up and saw another ape flying, he might get shook up, but he wouldnít shoot.

Virdon:
No, no.

Galen:
He is not going to get shook up because he is not going to see an ape flying.

Virdon:
Galen, you gotta do it.

Burke:
Itís you or itís alas, poor Leuric.

Galen:
Save your breath. Itís out of the question! I refuse! I absolutely put my foot down!

 

 

Leuric:
(on the glider with Galen) I made it happen. What nobody ever did before!

Galen:
You also may be killed the way no one has ever been killed before.

 

 

Galen:
(on a raft, escaping with Leuric, Burke and Virdon) Oh please, somebody shoot me.

Leuric:
Whatís wrong with him?

Burke:
Ancient human disease. Sea sickness.